Posts Tagged 'BehaviouralChange'

The Ancient Chinese Science of Organisational Transformation

by LeaderShape Faculty Member, Maiqi Ma

China Business

‘IF A GOVERNMENT becomes unpopular, neither good nor bad policies would be welcomed.’ The words illustrate how the Chinese people value the trustworthiness of leaders and remind me of the so-called ‘Tacitus Trap’ (referring to the Roman philosopher), who asks:

Why are efforts to change such hard work? And, why is changing mind-sets and behaviours hard work too?

Employees who are asked report that their companies’ initiatives most often reinforce changes through formal mechanisms; role modelling is used least often.

I am not surprised. My diagnosis is that these companies lack a culture based in human relations. I would provide a prescription to the leaders derived from the ancient Chinese science of organisational transformation: ‘Letting your people understand the reasons, moving them on with affection, guiding them through self modelling and having an attractive benefits package.’ The prerequisite for these principles is… that the leaders should be virtuous!

This is the beginning of a journey to grow future leaders and develop teams that can speak the same leadership language. Why not take a look here?

According to the ‘Doctrine of Confucius and Mencius’, a virtuous leader should meet three conditions. Firstly, (s)he should let his people have a ‘certain livelihood’. My interpretation of ‘certain livelihood’ for nowadays is a ‘fair salary’ and most definitely not the ‘zero hours contract’ model. (One complaint I heard from a small company is that the business owner’s wife did very little work, never appeared in the office and yet had a much higher salary than the full-time staff.)

Secondly, they should teach people, not only about knowledge and skills but, more importantly, human relations. For example there should be a sense of righteousness between bosses and managers; between senior and junior levels, a proper order…The core of all relations is mutual respect and differentiation. Mencius says that ‘when the prince regards his ministers as his hands and feet, his ministers regard their prince as their stomach and heart; … when he regards them as the ground or as grass, they regard him as a robber and an enemy.’

Qing_Dynasty_Chess_pawnsI have heard many middle managers say that they are treated like pawns in a game of chess by their bosses. In many organisations, the bosses often seem to regard the shareholders as the most important associates, while staff are least important. At employee level, the attitude is often ‘this is not my business. I don’t care.’

Another complaint I have heard from some renowned companies is that frontline staff’s basic wages are the same regardless of individual levels of education and length of service. This is a source of irritation for the senior staff and results in a high turnover of employees. They feel that their expertise and loyalty are overlooked.

Third and last, the leader should ensure there is a wide sense of shared pleasure. I was once having lunch with a senior manager of one of the top 100 companies. He introduced a mini golf game right there in the staff canteen and said to me: ‘If you like, you can take a golf ball home. Our boss likes golf.’ I was impressed by his pride, but I did not take a golf ball with me!

Confucius says that virtue is like the North Pole star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards it. Mencius comments ‘when one by force subdues men, they do not submit to him in their hearts…when one subdues men by virtue, they are pleased deep in their hearts and will submit with sincerity.’ So, it is much better to say ‘What can I learn in order to influence or persuade my people to change?’ rather than ‘Changing mind-sets and behaviours is hard work.’

 

apptitleLeaderShaper for Organisational Development.

THERE IS NOTHING LIKE the LeaderShaper App to provide a sense of how Emotionally Intelligent (EI) your leaders and managers are; this is the first effective self-assessment tool available in this format.

 

A challenge for the book industry?

2014-01-09T211337Z_4_CBREA0812MG00_RTROPTP_3_BARNESANDNOBLE-RESULTS_originalWHAT IS CHANGING is not the popularity or usefulness of the book, but the way authors create and share, and readers find and enjoy them.
Continue reading ‘A challenge for the book industry?’

Thinking like a patient, acting like a taxpayer, behaving like an emotionally intelligent leader

THE NEW NHS England CEO, Simon Stevens, is a breath of fresh air. He is offering new perspectives on the challenge to leaders, and one key message, recognised by the Nuffield Trust, is the need for organisations to work across boundaries, and to abandon a top-down approach in favour of establishing new models of care that work locally.

This is demanding for board members – how can you get the right sort of change while devolving decisions about that change? The answer Simon Stevens offers, and he is right, is to develop “values-based leadership” to create a climate conducive to the right sort of change. This will take emotionally intelligent leaders, and a questioning and challenging board, working in the interests of the public and not within organisational silos.
See Simon Stevens’ speech to the NHS Confederation here

And we have provided the response from the Nuffield Trust also.

The LeaderShape Faculty has worked with many boards and directors in the NHS to develop leadership and build strategies, so please get in touch on contact@leadershape.biz if you would like to discuss these issues with us.

Regards

Duncan Enright, LeaderShape.

 

First for NHS 360 Degree Facilitation

Greg Young LeaderShapeLEADERSHAPE IS DELIGHTED to announce that Chief Executive, Greg Young, has been confirmed as a facilitator for the new NHS 360 leadership assessments – the first of a cohort of just 50 people who hold this new accreditation in the UK.

 

The NHS Leadership Academy website explains:
Bringing the Leadership Model to life and helping people use it in their everyday practice is enormously important. Research into 360° feedback has shown that the provision of quality feedback from a coach or facilitated session plays a crucial role in encouraging managers to accept results of their assessment and initiate behavioural change.

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The way we manage ourselves is a central part of being an effective, (and what LeaderShape would call a transpersonal) leader. It is vital to recognise that personal qualities like self-awareness, self-confidence, self-control, self-knowledge, personal reflection, resilience and determination are the foundation of how we behave. Being aware of your strengths and limitations in these areas will have a direct effect on how you behave and interact with others.

Whether you work directly with patients and service users or not, this can affect the care experience they have. Working positively on these personal qualities will lead to a focus on care and high-quality services for patients and service users, their carers and their families.

Continue reading ‘First for NHS 360 Degree Facilitation’

Amazon, Publishers and Us

FIRST, LET’S AGREE – Amazon is not a bookseller, though that is how it began life. It is a multiple retailer, a Walmart of the web and an internet chainstore of everything.

Amazon is one of the dominant commercial powers of our age, though not consistently profitable it has the ability to be so at the flick of a switch. It can and does put competitors out of business. It has ambitions and has made forays into product development as well as retailing. It is a behemoth, straddling the world right now. But can it be a successful book publisher? A new article in the New Yorker discusses its progress in the world of books.

Continue reading ‘Amazon, Publishers and Us’

A toothbrush and a pat on the back!

THE EVIDENCE IS OVERWHELMING, says LeaderShape Faculty Member, Duncan Enright,  that financial incentives have only extremely limited value in driving motivation towards corporate goals. Most goals worth aiming for are not easily described as just an amalgamation of specific measurable targets.  People are generally motivated by personal fulfilment; financial reward is more important as a sign of success and approval, than as a driver of required behaviour (behaviour can’t be “driven”).

Salary is a hygiene factor, a potential demotivator if too low (as it breeds low esteem) but rarely a motivator. I have seen in my career many examples of people unhappy or anxious about pay as a proxy for status (for example when finding out others earn more for what is perceived as the same or less work) than I have seen successful bonus or salary schemes.

I’d go so far as to say I have never seen a good bonus scheme!

Fairness between staff, sharing and celebrating success and an accepted, but also fair differential between top and bottom pay, count for far more than ideas of incentive.

In my first job as a door-to-door salesman for a carpet cleaning company, I can still remember one week winning the best sales award: a toothbrush and a pat on the back from the company owner! I can’t remember being inspired by the rather complex and arbitrary salary arrangements at the big companies I worked with subsequently, though I do recall that as a staff member and as a manager they were a source of annual stress, misery and demotivation.

 

Duncan Enright  has been a senior director with over 25 years experience in the publishing industry, as well as a decade as a Vice Chair and Non-Executive Director of an NHS Trust.

 

Read our case study showing how LeaderShape helped one company change its corporate culture,  opening up communication, empowering individuals to take initiative and decisions,  supporting individuals in their development and enabling people to maximise their potential.

CIPD review of Leadership Assessment for Talent Development

CIPD – People Management Magazine review

THANKS TO the CIPD’s professional journal, People Management, who reviewed John Knights and Tony Wall’s top-rated publication Leadership Assessment for Talent Development, saying:

From nine leading academics and consultants comes a thoroughly modern take on judging leaders, reflecting a world in which “knowledge is increasingly available to everyone.” By necessity there’s an emphasis on broader interpersonal skills rather than strategic (in particular the idea of the “transpersonal leader” gets a great deal of discussion), but this is still an engrossing guide for leaders or the HR directors empowering them, with some excellent analytical digressions on storytelling, coaching and diagnosing executive blind spots.